TV: Sinbad – Episode 11 Summary + Review

“Prepare for dodgy CG and all that “

(“You’ve shouldn’t give money to kids you don’t know. It’s creepy…”)

Airing on: Sky

Genre: Adventure, Family, Action, Fantasy, Drama, Age: All ages

Released: 8th July 2012 – onwards

From the previous episode, Sinbad and the crew sail to an monastery to visit Tiger’s friend Angelico, who holds maps. They are hoping to find a map to the Land of the Dead. At the monastery, a monk called Father La Stessa has his eyes set on a widowed woman, Lara, as his own.

Warning! May contain spoilers!

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The crew land on shore to find an abandoned Harbourmans’s post. Asking around they find out that this has happened before, and a monster called the Fiend is attacking the locals.

(Everyone waited outside politely, until someone told them the guy had died)

Bother Angelico, the person the crew want to leave is slowly growing older and weaker, and is close to dying.

(“You can’t die here, otherwise we have to clean it up…”)

Gunnar leaves the crew with the intention to become a silk merchant. His first delivery doesn’t go to plan, as the receiver cannot pay him.

(“Hi, how you doing?”)

However, the widow, Lara, does invite him in. In a whirlwind romance, the two decide they are destined for each other. Father La Stessa, who has spied the couple from the window, in jealousy and confusion, takes Gunnar hostage.

(“Did anyone call rape? No, well, you’re dead anyway…”)

Sinbad asks the skittish tavern owner how they might be able to rescue Gunnar, ans he points out a lesser known passageway.

(The Tavern owner wasn’t biting Sinbad, just grooming him like a chimp)

Sinbad and Tiger head for the monastery, and Tiger realises that Brother Angelico is about to die. He dashes her hopes when he tells her a confusing passage of how to get to the Land of the Dead.

(“Brother Angelico, when you go the Land of the Dead, can you post us a map”)

Sinbad and the rest rush in on Gunnar’s execution. Sinbad promises to prove that Gunnar is not the Fiend, by drawing out the real one.

(Gunnar is accused of being too manly and handsome. He must die.)

Father La Stessa confronts Lara about his feelings for her, angry that she could give her love to a stranger, when he had been after her for years.

(“I think it would be best if I got the meaty-looking guy. Seriously”)

Anwar and Rina look for clues in the Harbour Master’s post. Rina discovers annotation of the ceilings, and the calculations of when the fiend will appear next.

(“Rina, this is no time to declare your love for me…”)

Running to the monastery to warn the others, they realise they are too late when the Tavern owner transforms before their eyes into the Fiend. He follows Gunnar’s scent, sent to him by Father La Stessa who controls the beast.

(Just when you think the CG in Sinbad was improving…)

Gunnar fights off the Fiend and the others manage to distract him towards Father La Stessa instead.

(It’s almost the end of the series, Sinbad should know how to use a sword by now)

Tiger discovers a hidden map for the Land of the Dead inside a pond. Unluckily, she is caught by Taryn, who has hiding in disguise as Father Angelico’s nurse.

(The map proves to be elusive, and poorly lit)

The crew set sail with this new information, and Gunnar reluctantly coming along. Little do they know that Tiger is now possessed by Taryn.

(Taryn needs to invest her black magic powers in some eye cream)

Overall, it felt like the writer’s tried to stuff too many details into one episode. The disjointed feel of the monster, coupled with the unrealistic love of Gunnar and Lara, and Father La Stessa being a shamelessly obvious bad guy. It just didn’t stick well. Added to that mix was Taryn, who magically appears from nowhere to possess Tiger.

How many twists were in this episode, and how many were plausible? At least the plot is moving forward, even if it’s at breakneck speed.

Rated 3/5 – Confusing with multiple wanderings from characters.

See the next episode!

See the previous episode!

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